Crunchfuls at the Sustainable Food Summit 2012 in San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA – January 18, 2012

Dr. Deepa Shenoy, Founder and CEO of Crunchfuls, Inc. was invited as a speaker at the Sustainable Foods Summit in San Francisco, CA. Dr. Shenoy presented a comparison of animal proteins and plant proteins, highlighting the historic and current importance of legumes as a sustainable and efficient source of proteins.

The fifth edition of the Sustainable Foods Summit drew to a successful close on 18th January, with about 180 executives convening in San Francisco to discuss key sustainability issues. The Sustainable Foods Summit (http://www.sustainablefoodssummit.com) is a series of international summits that focuses on the leading issues the food industry faces concerning sustainability and eco-labels, such as Organic, Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance, UTZ Certified, etc.

Summary of Dr. Shenoy’s presentation:

Food security is a challenge: We live in a world that is rapidly changing. For the food sector particularly, the challenges are immense. As the world population grows and globalization brings more prosperity to developing economies in Asia and Africa, the demand for food and better nutrition is rising.  Globally, food producers and consumers are now competing for precious natural resources such as arable land, energy and water. These competing demands and the immediate effects on our ecosystem are now threatening our food security.

The cost of animal proteins: Livestock consumption is growing. The increasing per capita demand for meat in the world is expected to double to approx 45 kgs or 100lbs per year by 2030. Cost of meat from cradle to gate is expensive for the producer and the environment- consider production and transportation of  feed,  transport and refrigeration of perishables like meat, dairy and eggs , waste management, contamination of potable water with animal pollutants and animal-borne diseases, loss of arable land due to overgrazing. Livestock contributes 18% of green house gas emissions, 70% of all land used for agriculture and 8% of water usage. The FAO calls this phenomenon the long shadow impact on the environment. The US leads the world in meat production and consumption and averages 30 livestock to every human being. Moreover, livestock consumes 7 times as much grain as humans do. Daily per capita consumption of meat is 77 grams which exceeds the daily recommended allowance of 56 grams of total protein. 

Demand for protein is increasing: Protein is accepted as a functional dietary requirement for every age category and for multiple benefits such as weight-loss, low glycemic and high-performance food segments. Protein is considered the lesser evil and also in many cases the Fountain of Youth. It is critical to find alternative good resources of protein that are also sustainable. Without sound food policy and adaptation, protein availability will be difficult. Data suggests animal proteins are far less efficient in feeding the planet compared to plant protein e.g. an animal eats about 10x more protein than it can provide as meat. And meat requires about 100 times more water over its lifecycle from cradle to gate.

Legumes are an important protein source: A great alternative in the quest for sustainable proteins are legumes.  Legumes are grown across the world from cold climate countries like Canada to the hot tropics of India and form the basis of ancient food traditions.  Because of their soil-building capabilities, farmers have used crop rotation with legumes to maintain the quality of soil and their yield.  Densely populated India which forms 1/6th of the world population is the largest producer and consumer of legumes as a major protein source. Legumes unlike grains such as wheat grow in very large varieties that are used in multiple ways from direct consumption as forage crops and grain to use in industrial applications. Value addition and demand for derived products encourage farmers to grow more legumes.

Legumes can reduce our dependence on fossil fuel based fertilizers: Field peas for instance can absorb 80% of nitrogen from the atmosphere and require 20% nitrogen from the soil during the initial growth phase. The nitrogen fixed by field peas is measured at 178lbs per acre during a study. The nitrogen derived from the atmosphere and fixed by the legume crop is then available to subsequent crops, typically wheat, increasing yield and protein content by 30%.

Plant proteins lead animal proteins in efficiency metrics: A study published in Food Policy in 2011 was conducted in Sweden to analyze the efficiency metrics for various types of foods by analyzing the energy use and green house emissions associated with the production and transportation of 84 common food items of animal and vegetable origin. The study confirmed the higher energy and GHG emission cost of animal proteins.  The contrast between the lead meat and vegetable protein sources – beef and beans offers the following sharp contrast: While the protein content is comparable at 206 and 210 grams, the energy use in meat is about 10 times and GHG emissions 29 times when compared to beans. The energy use efficiency to deliver protein from plant sources is much larger than for animal-based foods. The energy use for animal products range from 4 to 11 g protein per MJ of energy invested, for cereals ranged from 8 to 57g protein/MJ and for legumes from 41 to 77g protein/MJ. Legumes have the highest efficiency, and livestock products have lowest – almost 4-8 fold lower efficiency than legumes and cereals. The larger the animal protein content the less efficient it is in  using natural resources, fossil  fuels,  water, soil, etc in production . Similarly, plant proteins have a positive efficiency of protein delivery per kg of Green House Gasses (GHG) emitted, while animal based proteins shows a negative correlation. When energy efficiency vs. GHG efficiency for protein delivery is compared, plant proteins particularly legumes such as soybean and peas score very high compared to animal proteins. In terms of water use, animal proteins are much more water intensive. 

Current challenges to increasing legume consumption: While policies can help educate the public on the benefits of consuming more legumes, there are several factors that prevent their greater adoption. In the US particularly, lack of familiarity and lack of knowledge to integrate legumes in the diet, taste and sensorial preferences and  lifestyles that require minimal cooking and more on-the-go alternatives.  To succeed, any product must meet the expectations in terms of affordability, convenience and enjoyment. An example is the soybean industry. While soy, also a legume, ranks very high on the efficiency index as we saw earlier, soy has achieved immense success as a protein source in the forms of concentrates and isolates.

Crunchfuls is a pulse-legume platform of ready-to-eat foods: Crunchfuls is a snack product made from steam puffing beans and lentils with the goal to bring the benefits of these wonderful ingredients into daily diets. In Crunchfuls, we have created a balance of function, ingredient choice and consumer preferences to achieve a shelf-stable ready to eat product that is mainstream in taste, form and texture while also being highly scalable. For more information, please visit: http://www.crunchfuls.com

References:

Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases, FAO

Sustainability of meat-based diets and the environment: David Pimentel and Marcia Pimentel. Am J Clin Nutr 2003;78(suppl):660s-3s

Reijnders, L. & Soret, S. 2003. Quantification of the environment impact of different dietary protein choices

FAO. 2006. Livestock’s long shadow

A.D. Gonzalez et Al, Food Policy, 36(2011) p562-570

Protein Quality of Cooked Pulses, Pulse Canada

Crunchfuls Makes a Splash in School Nutrition

Crunchfuls Makes a Splash in School Nutrition!

Crunchfuls Inc showcased its new snacks and at the Annual School Nutrition Conference (ANC 2011) in Nashville, Tennessee. Crunchfuls supports the mission of the School Nutrition Association, to educate and provide exceptional nutrition for every child. Helping children eat healthier at a younger age can prevent many problems that may develop in their early or later years, like obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

The Composition of Crunchfuls

Crunchfuls is composed of pulse crops, also known as pulseeds. Pulse crops are legumes (beans and lentils). Pulseeds are locally grown and manufactured, and steam-cooked in the United States. They are typically harvested in the fall. The USDA states the peas and lentils are a great source of protein, fiber, and nutrients like folate and potassium. Peas and lentils are not only found in the vegetable group, but are also found in the protein group because of their high protein content. “Proteins serve as building blocks for cartilage, bones, muscles, skin and blood (USDA).” Pulseeds embody a complete protein profile, meaning that they contain adequate amounts of all nine amino acids, necessary for various biological functions. Pulseeds also contain a great deal of soluble and insoluble fibers, as well as prebiotic oligosaccharides. The oligosaccharides found in pulses are stachyose and raffinose. In Crunchfuls, the pulses are not soaked, but rather are stone- ground. This procedure keeps in all of the nutrients as well as the oligosaccharide content. Crunchfuls cereals and snacks are a great source of complete protein and fiber, and are a superior way to make vegetables part of one’s daily diet.

Great nutrition and great focus

Children, who eat a nutritious breakfast as well as meals throughout the day, are able to learn and focus in school at a much higher rate than children who do not eat nutritious meals.  According to the article, Nutrition and School Performance, by Trish Fitzpatrick and Elsie Deroose, in the journal EPI North (The Northwest Territories Epidemiology Newsletter), eating a healthy breakfast, as well as meals throughout the day, provides children with better cognitive brain function. Also, according to the USDA, kids learn and are able to focus more effectively with a healthy diet. Just by eating healthier, children can be more focused in school, and learn at a higher rate. Crunchfuls cereal and snacks are very high in fiber, protein, and complex carbohydrates, and would be a great addition to any child’s diet. 

RDA’s, AI’s and DRI’s for Children

Table 1

CHO (g)  PRO  (g)  Fiber  (g)  T Fat  (g)  S Fat (g) Trans Fat (g) Sugar  (g)
 RDA  RDA  AI  AI RDA/AI
Crunchfuls Cereals (1/2C, 28 g)

22

4

4

2

0

0

3

 Crunchfuls Snacks (1 C, 28 g)

20

4

4

2.5

0

0

<1
 
1-3 Y

130

13

19

ND

0

4-8 Y

130

19

25

ND

0

Males 9-13 Y

130

34

31

ND

0

Males 14-18 Y

130

52

38

ND

0

Females 9-13 Y

130

34

26

ND

0

Females 14-18 Y

130

46

26

ND

0

DRI
1-3 Y 45-65% 45-65% 30-40% <25% T Energy
4-18 Y 5-20% 10-30% 25-35%

RDA’s AI’s and DRI’s are measured per day. RDA: Recommended dietary allowance; AI: Adequate Intake; DRI: Dietary Reference Intake

Crunchfuls manufactures healthy cereals and Snacks from beans and lentils, for any time of the day. Our cereals and snacks come from vegetables, and are high in complex carbohydrates, fiber, and protein, are low in sugar and fat, contain no cholesterol, and are allergen free, gluten free, and all natural. According to the USDA’s dietary guidelines for all Americans 2010, portion control, eating a diet high in fruits, and vegetables, having half your grains come from whole grains, limiting fat, sugar, and sodium intake are all very important.

USDA’s Beans and Lentils

Table 2

Beans and Lentils Vegetable Servings Protein grams/D
1/2 cup cooked (approx 60g raw)

1

4

According to the USDA, a half cup of cooked beans and lentils is equivalent to 1 serving of vegetables or 1 serving of protein. Crunchfuls cereals and snacks are made with beans and lentils; therefore with it is easy to get servings of vegetables and protein through Crunchfuls cereals and snacks. Each ½ cup of Crunchfuls is ½ protein or ½ vegetable serving.

USDA’s Vegetable and Protein requirements for Children 

Table 3

Vegetable (C/D) Protein (OZ/D)
Children
2-3 Y

1

2

4-8 Y

1 1/2

4

Females
9-13 Y

2

5

14-18 Y

2 1/2

5

Males
9-13 Y

2 1/2

5

14-18 Y

3

6

Crunchfuls being included in The NSLP

The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is implemented in over 100,000 schools today. The NSLP abides by the USDA’s Dietary guidelines for all Americans. Caloric intake and physical activity should be kept balanced. Increasing the intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is important, as well limiting cholesterol, fat, and sugar intake. The NSLP encompasses lunch as well as afternoon snack. Crunchfuls’ nutrient density makes it a great candidate for the NSLP. Please refer to Tables 1 and 2.

Crunchfuls for School Nutrition

Crunchfuls cereals and snacks are nutrient dense, and are very delicious.  A healthy product like Crunchfuls would be a great addition to schools. Our products are cost effective, nutritious, and will keeps kids satisfied and focused all day long. Crunchfuls will revolutionize the school nutrition initiative by adding all natural beans and lentils to everyday cereals and snacks.

References:

Take a bite and crunch your way through our new website!

Great News! The Crunchfuls Team would like to announce the Launch of the new and improved Crunchfuls website! Our new website contains the company credo, a profile of our team, detailed nutrient information, sustainability, scientific articles, past press releases, upcoming events, and much more. Browse through our website to learn more about Crunchfuls products and why you should eat them! The website goes into great detail about the health benefits of our deliciously mouthwatering cereals and snacks. You can also find information regarding the ingredients, as well as how our steam- cooking process works. These high fiber, high protein, superfoods can be a great kickstart to your morning and can keep you going all day.

On the new website, you can easily find all the information you seek about our products, as well as get all your questions answered. We also have an FAQ section where you can view what the buzz around Crunchfuls is.

Have fun embarking on a journey through the world of Crunchfuls! And please give us any feedback you have about the website and/ or our products. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact us at info@crunchfuls.com.

Crunchfuls supports the new food plate guidelines

Choose my Plate

MyPlate

The USDA issued a new food guide pyramid, called Choose my Plate, which Michelle Obama revealed on June 2, 2011. This new plate model goes along with the health initiative Michelle Obama has been driving. Child Obesity and just obesity in general are sky-rocketing. The obesity epidemic needs to be eradicated. The cardinal reason why people are obese and choose options like supersize and jumbo are because many americans do not know what portion sizes look like. Americans need to be better educated on how to eat nutritiously and follow a healthy lifestyle. Knowing what portion sizes are for the different food groups is a very simple and easy step to getting back on track to a healthier you.

The USDA has made recommendations to balance calories, by not eating too much of any particular food group, and not overeating. Vegetables are a big portion of the plate. Half of your food intake should come from fruits and vegetables, and at least half of your grains should come from whole grains opposed to refined grains. Switching to nonfat or low fat milk should also be a priority.

Fruits and vegetables should be a large part of your diet. The amount that should be ingested depends on your age and sex. An average of 2 ½ cups each of fruits and vegetables should be eaten per day. Eating high amounts of fruits and vegetables helps in reducing the risk of getting heart disease, stroke, heart attack, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Eating fruits and vegetables also reduces blood pressure and prevents kidney stones from forming, and helps decrease bone loss. Vegetables are also nutrient filled.

Grains and protein make up the other half of the plate. The amount of grains and protein that should be ingested differs based on age and sex. At least half of your grains should come from whole grains. Eating whole grains can help with weight management, can prevent heart disease, and whole grains also containing fiber can prevent constipation. Protein serves as the building blocks for bones, muscles, skin, cartilage, and blood. Protein is very important for providing energy to the body. Many vitamins and minerals found in proteins are beneficial for the body, and are necessary for growth and well- being.

Dairy is off of the plate, but is still necessary in small amounts. Whenever drinking milk make sure it is either non- fat or low- fat. When eating cheese, chose cheeses like cheddar and Swiss. If you feel a craving for something sweet, instead of ice cream, choose frozen yogurt. These changes can really make a difference.

So now you ask where does Crunchfuls fit into all of this? Well Crunchfuls products contain pulses which are beans and lentils. Crunchfuls comes from vegetables! Beans and lentils are a great source of protein, iron, zinc, and many more nutrients.  Every 1 cup of Crunchfuls cereal contains 1 whole serving of vegetables! That is almost ½ of your needed servings per day! You can eat a sweet and yummy breakfast, while getting 1 whole serving of vegetables with every cup. Crunchfuls also contains a great deal of protein in every bite. How many cereals can give you vegetables and protein? Just one! Crunchfuls is unique, and one of a kind. Eating it really supports the USDA’s and Michelle Obama’s Get Moving initiative.

For further information on the new food plate guidelines: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

Crunchfuls is Great for Digestive Health

If you feel great you perform even better! It is as simple as that! Just eat Crunchfuls and feel amazing instantly. The fiber and prebiotics work their magic in your body even before you have time to say yum crunchfuls! Going more into detail, Crunchfuls contains a great deal of soluble fiber, which is fermented by the gut bacteria in the colon to produce short chain fatty acids: acetate, butyrate, propionate, and gases. Acetate and propionate get metabolized in the liver. Butyrate is very important because it inhibits the growth and spreading of tumor cells in vitro. Butyrate is also a great source of energy for colon cells. The production of short chain fatty acids decreases the ph in the gut, which is important because a lower ph allows the enzymes in the stomach to work more efficiently.

Oligosaccharides are fermented in the colon by gut bacteria, to produce the short chain fatty acids: acetate, butyrate, and propionate; as well as to produce the gases methane and hydrogen. The oligosaccharides found in pulses are: stachyose, raffinose, and sucrose. In Crunchfuls, the pulses are not soaked, but rather are stone- ground. This procedure keeps in all of the nutrients as well as oligosaccharide content. In a study, it was shown that soaking Pulses lead to a 25% reduction in raffinose, and a 24.8% reduction in stachyose. It’s a good thing we do not soak our pulses!!

Prebiotics are dietary fiber, which stimulate the growth of bacteria in the colon. Prebiotic fiber is very prevalent in pulses. Many health benefits exist like, prevention of constipation, ulcerative colitis, small intestinal bacteria overgrowth, pediatric diarrhea, antibiotic- induced diarrhea, food allergy, and impaired immune function. Prebiotics can really make a huge difference in health.

Lucky for you, Crunchfuls provides you with all the fiber, prebiotics, and oligosaccharides you could ask for! Have a happy and healthy gut. We promise you that you will feel great, and perform even better in anything you do!

Crunchfuls® expands in Whole Foods Markets and Raley’s Supermarkets

05/13/2011 – Mountain View, CA

Crunchfuls® cereals have launched in Whole Foods Markets in Northern California. Crunchfuls also celebrated further expansion in the 143 store Raley’s chain with product launches in Raley’s location in Tracy and Salinas, CA.

“Through our relationship with Whole Foods Market and Raley’s, we now have an opportunity to reach more consumers in Northern California region. As a growing brand and an expanding product-line consisting of cereals and snacks, we are poised to meet the expectations of shoppers looking for better choices to improve their health and positively impact the environment.” said Dr. Deepa Shenoy, Founder and CEO of Pul Foods. “Our products offer a unique crunch from steam-cooked pulse-legumes (beans and lentils) with intensely delicious flavors.  With beans and lentils  as the  key ingredient, increasing consumption of Crunchfuls will increase demand and add value to a nitrogen-fixing and water conserving crop grown by farmers in crop rotation to improve yields of cereal crops and help break pest cycles.”

Crunchfuls cereals and snacks are made from all natural ingredients such as whole seeds of lentils and beans, brown and white rice. The products offer high-protein and high-fiber allergen-free alternative with ingredients that are superior to whole-grain and offer servings of vegetables. The cereals are available in two flavors, Chocolate and Caramel. The snack line includes Chili-Lime, Barbecue and Tomato Basil flavors in 1oz pouches for retail and food-service.

Pul Foods, Inc., based in Mountain View, CA, is the manufacturer and inventor of Crunchfuls. The company continues to expand its presence in retail and in food service. Crunchfuls was launched in the Northern California market in April 2010. The products are available for sale nationwide through the company website (http://www.crunchfuls.com). The company works closely with the farmers with the goal of increasing consumption of lentils and beans. The US dry bean and lentil growers organizations are strong supporters of Crunchfuls.

For further information, please contact: info@pulfoods.com

Crunchfuls® adds vegetable-based savory snacks to product line

Crunchfuls® adds vegetable-based savory snacks to product line

Mountain View, CA – April 08, 2011

Pul Foods Inc. of Mountain View, CA announced the launch of Crunchfuls superfood savory snacks in retail and in food service in the San Francisco Bay Area. 100 Calorie, 1oz serving Crunchfuls snacks offers 4 grams of complete protein and 4 grams of gentle vegetable fiber, complex carbohydrates for sustained energy. A 1oz serving of Crunchfuls offers a full serving of vegetable.

Crunchfuls is a pioneering line of 100% natural breakfast cereals and savory snacks made primarily from steam-cooked and toasted pulse legume seeds or Pulseeds® (dry beans, lentils and split peas), offering a a nutrient dense vegetable-based option better than high sugar-high salt grain,soy, potato or corn based offerings. Crunchfuls is gluten-free, nut-free, vegan and kosher. Offering a healthier alternative to fried, baked and popped snacks that involve oil-puffing, Crunchfuls snacks are a satiating meal with a deep signature crunch.

The savory snacks in zesty flavors such as barbecue, chili lime and tomato basil flavors follow the commercial success of Chocolate and Caramel Crunchfuls cereals that are currently sold in Northern California and nationally online through the company’s website www.crunchfuls.com. Crunchfuls has made it to top editor picks both at Natural Products Expo West 2011and the Winter Fancy Food Show. Crunchfuls was honored as top three product of the year finalist for the innovation-based Nutraward, Edison Award nominee for societal impact and the Growing Green Award for sustainability.

“Consumers no longer have to choose between empty calories with no satiety and indulgence” Dr. Deepa Shenoy, founder and CEO of Pul Foods explained. “By harnessing the goodness of beans and lentils, that are as gentle as a vegetable and twice as nutritious as grain and oats, we have created a transformational category of superfood snacks that are intensely delicious and densely nutritious”.

Sustainability: Crunchfuls is primarily made with Pulseeds® found in the pods of pulse legumes crops, also known as pulses. Pulses naturally enrich the soil with nitrogen and break pest cycles for other cereal and oil crops and so, help reduce the use of artificial fertilizer and pesticides and maintain natural top soil. Water: is a key resource for the food supply chain. Pulseeds® use only 43 gallons of water to 1lb vs other comparable sources of protein: 216 gallons of water for 1lb of soybean, 425 gallons of water for 1lb of chicken and 1,894 gallons of water for 1lb of beef.

Please come join us at the Milk Pail Market on San Antonio Road (border of Los Altos and Mountain View) and Sigona’s markets in Palo Alto for the launch of Crunchfuls snacks weekend of April 9th and 10th.

For further information, please contact:

Pul Foods Inc., 809 B Cuesta Drive #108, Mountain View, CA

info@pulfoods.com / (650) 965-1140